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Rochester Institute of Technology

United States
Campus setting Information not available
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Institution type Private

About Rochester Institute of Technology


It is a vibrant community teeming with students collaborating with experts and specialists: a hub of innovation and creativity. It is an intersection of disciplines, a launching pad for a brilliant career, and a highly unique state of mind.

It is a perfect environment in which to pursue your passion. Here, the future is envisioned each day. And remade each day after.

Campus information

The current campus is housed on a 1,300 acres (5.3 km2) property. This property is largely covered with woodland and fresh-water swamp making it a very diverse wetland which is home to a number of somewhat rare plant species. The campus comprises 237 buildings and 5.1 million square feet (474,000 m²) of building space. The nearly universal use of bricks in the campus's construction — estimated at 14,673,565 bricks in late 2006 — prompted students to give it the semi-affectionate nickname "Brick City," reflected in the name of events such as the annual "Brick City Homecoming." Though the buildings erected in the first few decades of the campus's existence reflected the architectural style known as brutalism, the warm color of the bricks softened the impact somewhat. More recent additions to the campus have diversified the architecture while still incorporating the traditional brick colors. In October 2013, Travel+Leisure named it as one of the ugliest college campuses in the United States, citing the monotone brick and the suburbanization, leaving almost no youth activities within walking distance of the campus.

In 2009, the campus was named a "Campus Sustainability Leader" by the Sustainable Endowments Institute.

The residence halls and the academic side of campus are connected with a walkway called the "Quarter Mile." Along the Quarter Mile, between the academic and residence hall side are various administration and support buildings. On the academic side of the walkway is a courtyard, known as the Infinity Quad due to a striking polished stainless steel sculpture (by Jose' de Rivera, 1968, 19'×8'×21⁄2') of a continuous ribbon-like Möbius strip (commonly referred to as the infinity loop because if the sun hits the strip at a certain angle it will cast a shadow in the shape of an infinity symbol on the ground) in the middle of it; on the residence hall side is a sundial and a clock. These symbols represent time to infinity.[dubious – discuss] The Quarter Mile is actually 0.41 miles (0.66 km) long when measured between the mobius sculpture and the sundial. The name comes from a student fundraiser, where quarters were lined up from the sundial to the Infinity Sculpture. Standing near the Administration Building and the Student Alumni Union is The Sentinel, a steel structure created by the acclaimed metal sculptor, Albert Paley. Reaching 70 feet (21 m) high and weighing 110 tons, the sculpture is the largest on any American university campus. There are six RIT-owned apartment complexes: Colony Manor, Global Village, Perkins Green, Racquet Club, Riverknoll and University Commons.

Along the Quarter Mile is the Gordon Field House, a 160,000-square-foot (15,000 m2), two-story athletic center. Opened in 2004 and named in honor of Lucius "Bob" Gordon and his wife Marie, the Field House hosts numerous campus and community activities, including concerts, career fairs, athletic competitions, graduations, and other functions. Other facilities between the residence halls and academic buildings include the Hale-Andrews Student Life Center, Student Alumni Union, Ingle Auditorium, Clark Gymnasium, Frank Ritter Memorial Ice Arena, and the Schmitt Interfaith Center.

Located on the west end of the RIT campus is RIT's Red Barn, the large, red-painted barn is the site of the university's Interactive Adventures program.

Park Point at RIT (originally referred to as "College Town") is an 80,000-square-foot (7,400 m2) multi-use residential and commercial enterprise on the northeast corner of the campus.Park Point is accessible to the rest of the RIT campus through a regular bus service loop, numerous pedestrian paths connecting Park Point to the RIT Main Loop, and main roads. Although originally intended as added student housing, financial penalties resulting from developing on swampland led RIT to lease Park Point to Wilmorite for a period of twenty years and subsequently develop the property without the institute incurring additional fees.

This metropolitan region situated on the southern shore of Lake Ontario is also part of New York’s breathtaking Finger Lakes region. Known for its vast selection of family-oriented activities and attractions, Rochester hosts nearly two million visitors each year. The third largest city in New York State, the greater Rochester region is inhabited by a little more than one million people. Conveniently located, Rochester is a six hour drive from New York City, 3 1/2 hours from Toronto and 90 minutes from Niagara Falls.

Rochester is home to world-class events throughout the year. The festival season kicks-off with the world’s largest lilac collection at Highland Park’s Lilac Festival (May) where hundreds of thousands visitors enjoy 10 days of brilliant floral colors, fragrance and entertainment. Downtown is alive with the sounds of jazz during the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival (June) held in the City’s East End Entertainment District, home to the renowned Eastman School of Music. Rochester has been named one of the 10 best golf cities in the country. It is the only city in the U.S. to host both the PGA championship (Oak Hill Country Club) and LPGA championship (Locust Hill Country Club) tournaments in one summer- 2013.

Rochester sits at the center of 100 Must-See Miles of the Erie Canal which when opened in 1825, made Rochester the country’s first “boomtown.” Today, the historic canal thrives as an active recreational waterway with towpaths, shops and charming towns telling America’s story of “how the west began!” Rochester is home to two national historic landmarks open to the public, the National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House and George Eastman Museum. Adults and children are entertained in the second largest children’s museum in the U.S., at the National Museum of Play at The Strong also home to the National Toy Hall of Fame.


Lifestyle Floors

  • Alcohol/Substance-Free Lifestyle Option
  • Co-ed Floors
  • Honors Housing
  • Intensified Study Floors
  • Living-Learning Communities
  • Mainstream Floors (with both deaf/hard-of-hearing and hearing students)
  • Single-Sex Floors
  • Single-Sex Suites
  • 21 and Over Lifestyle Option
  • Wellness Lifestyle Option

Special Interest Houses

  • Art House
  • Business Leaders of Tomorrow
  • Computer Science House
  • Engineering House
  • Entrepreneurs Hall
  • House of General Science
  • International House (American and international students)
  • Photo House
  • Unity House (promotes cultural awareness and diversity)

Greek Housing

  • 14 Fraternities
  • 12 Sororities

Courses available 10

Accounting and Finance 1 Applied and Pure Sciences 2 Architecture, Building & Planning 1 Creative Arts & Design 2 Engineering 1 Health and Medicine 1 Mass Communication & Media 1 MBA 1


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